Monthly Archives: August 2014

Story Structure: a Graphic You Can Use

You are one click away from a useable, printable, post-able (as in, on your wall) graphic  representation of classic 4-part story structure, including the 7 major story milestone transition “moments” within the story.

Get it right here: Structure Graphic.

In the previous post I framed this… as part of a Powerpoint presentation on the subject of: how to put your story on steroids.  While the live version had he witty and passionate audio that assists in clarity, the slides stand alone as a tutorial with punch.

Some readers have commented that a few of the other slides (#24, #25 and #28 especially) are just as valuable, if not more so.  As in: what you need to know about your story before it’ll work as well as it could, and in what order of priority.

Yes, that’s what I said.  Steroids.  A total shot in the petard of your story, to make it stronger, bigger, faster, better.  It’s legal, too, an added bonus.

If you’d like to see that entire presentation, click here: Story on Steroids

Hope you find this useful.

*****

Click HERE to land a trifecta opportunity: 1) score a mystery/thriller with killer reviews for only $1.99 for the Kindle edition; 2) download a totally FREE, no strings ebook that deconstructs the whole thing, while going behind the curtain to see how this book, and many like it, find their way to market; and 3) snag a rare learning opportunity to go deep and see the principles in play via an in-depth case study.

10 Comments

Filed under other cool stuff, Uncategorized

How to Elevate Your Story Above the Eager Crowd

The “crowd” is pretty good, too.   And they want what you want.  

So you need to be better.

Greetings from Los Angeles, where I’m presenting at the Writers Digest Novel Writing Conference.  I did two sessions yesterday, and later today I’m doing a workshop entitled: “Your Story on Steroids.”

This is why I like working with Writers Digest.

Not just because they publish my writing books and put my articles in their magazine (or that they sent me to China last month), they’re just cool, hip, really smart people.  They allowed me to use this title, they got the analogy.

I’ve tried several times to get this title on the agenda at a handful of other conferences, who were scared off by the word “steroids.”

Ooo… scary.  Steroids.  Bad.

Sure, they’re illegal if you’re talking about anabolic medication.  But not in this context, the context of writing really strong, compelling stories.  In that context we need all the medicine we can get, and we need the science that makes it happen.

And it’s an analogy, folks… deal with it.  It — in this analogous context — won’t make you sick and it won’t make your testicles shrink to the size of chick peas, nor will you go to hell for getting the analogy.

Anyhow, in preparation for today I’ve created a killer Powerpoint slide deck that doesn’t mince words.  I’d like to share it with you, too.  The people here paid for the live presentation and discussion, but the content is universal, and I’d like you to have it.

Get it here: Story on Steroids.

There’s a new structure graphic here, too (slide #32), that simplifies the four part, 7-milestone story structure model, worthy of printing out.  For all your visual thinkers out there.

Because good doesn’t cut it these days.

Our stories have to be great to separate from the incoming stream of good stories, most of which will be rejected for precisely that: they are merely good, totally solid… but not great.

Publishers are looking for the next home run.  Not the next book to take up a slot on a bookstore shelf.

Let’s be great today.  Hope this helps.

****

 

Click HERE to land a trifecta opportunity: 1) score a mystery/thriller with killer reviews for only $1.99 for the Kindle edition; 2) download a totally FREE, no strings ebook that deconstructs the whole thing, while going behind the curtain to see how this book, and many like it, find their way to market; and 3) snag a rare learning opportunity to go deep and see the principles in play via an in-depth case study.

11 Comments

Filed under Write better (tips and techniques)